Tag Archives: lessons learned

Conversations with a Pre*teen

6 Sep

Conversations with a Pre*Teen

“He knows some shit”

While riding in the car to school this morning, the song “drunk on a plane” by Dierks Bentley was on the radio softly playing the background of our morning conversations. Reilly, my 12 year old was singing along.

Trying not to make a big deal about it, I chime in.

“It’s not that appropriate for a kid to say ‘drunk’. Do you know what that even means?” I say, knowing that he knew what the word was, to an extent. I mean, at 12, you’ve already seen some shit and heard some shit.

“Yeah, Mom, I know what it means.” He says with his pre-teen “know-it-all” attitude.

“Okay, can you tell me what you think it means?” I ask.

“It’s when you drink too much alcohol.” He proceeds opening his eyes freakishly wide. “It affects your minnnnnnnnnnnd and makes you act all crazy and lose your thoughts.” He pauses for a brief second. “It hurts your brain.” He says all theatrically, waving his arms all around in an ape like manner.

“Oh yeah!?” I asked, trying not to laugh.

“Yeah, it’s like this for an example.” He starts in seriously.
“I think this might be the best way I can describe it. It’s like a phone that needs to be updated. It lags before the update, then it updates, resets, rests and it gets better. It works better.”

“Ohhh?” I asked, trying to understand his thought process of relating being “drunk” to a phone that needs to be updated. 🤷🏼‍♀️

“Yeah, it’s like not working. Your brain isn’t working and it makes all your internal organs and insides mad and not work.” He says with distinct truth.

“Oh, that’s an interesting comparison, Reilly.” I say, trying to say as little as possible. I can see the wheels moving and he has more to say…

“It impairs your function, mom.” He explains.

I paused. I let his knowledge of this topic sink in for a moment and I quickly realized that I am thankful for having this impromptu conversation about real life with him.

“You. Are. Absolutely. Right. It does impair your basic functions. Like walking, talking or driving…” I stated.

Being blown away with his knowledge of how alcohol affects your body I had to ask…

“So, where did you learn all of that, Reilly?” I ask, in hopes he doesn’t tell an embarrassing story he witnessed. 🙈

“I learned it watching a documentary!” He exclaims.

(phewwwwww)

“Okay…” I say, knowing he has watched many documentaries in his short existence.

“But, you do know… talking about being drunk isn’t appropriate for your age… and….”

“I know mom.” Reilly interrupts.

“Okay, because you aren’t even allowed to drink alcohol until you’re 21. When you turn 21 you can decide for yourself what you want to do. Some people take drinking alcohol to the extreme and don’t know when they need to stop. This makes them drunk and impairs their judgement and sometimes they make very bad choices. Like getting behind the wheel and driving…” I say again with a very serious voice. Since we are driving, I thought it was fitting.

“They also make choices to stay home and hang out with their friends being silly until like 3 in the morning, mom” He says, laughing like he’s seen or knows something.

“Yeah, that’s true Reilly. Those are called responsible drunk people.” I say laughing back.

If I can do anything with my children, I want to be open and honest with them. I want to teach them about their choices in life and how each choice can make a difference in their path in life. But, mostly I want them to know it’s always their choice. I can only hope they make the best choice. I can only hope I have raised them in the direction they must go by being an example. Not a perfect example, but a real one.

I love having these random conversations with my pre-teen. Although he drives me insane at times and I seriously worry about his future, it’s times like this that I am reassured that he has a good head on his shoulders and that he will ultimately make the good choices. Even if making a few bad ones along the way teach him that.

Love and Laughs!

April

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The best teacher

2 Sep

I strongly believe that the greatest teachers in life don’t know they are teaching…

I believe my Uncle Tut was one of those teachers…

  1. Despite what people might think, to be “Hawaiian” doesn’t come from a bloodline – it comes from where your heart is. “It’s what lies in there”
  2. A person who lacks riches doesn’t mean they are poor. Be rich with life, not possessions. Those things fade away
  3. There’s always going to be worry, don’t waste your precious time doing it.

    LOVE – SING – TALK STORY

  4. Family, “OHANA” is all around you. Don’t ever feel alone. “Hanai”
  5. Any moment could be a moment you’ll remember for the rest of your life – make each day count.
    “Hawaiian Cinderella”, “What does rain smell like”.
  6. Complaining is weak.
    Thankfulness is strong.
  7. You don’t need millions to enjoy a million dollar view. God has you in Hawaii for a reason. Enjoy its beauty, culture and respect its’ Aina.
  8. You don’t have to have much to be a giver.
Me and my Hawaiian Cinderella

Me and my Hawaiian Cinderella

12 things I need to start teaching my kids

19 May

12 things I hope to teach my children… now this is parenting!

1. My mother taught me about WEATHER.
“Your room looks like a tornado hit it.”
2. My mother taught me about RELIGION.
“You better pray that comes out of the carpet.”
3. My mother taught me about TIME TRAVEL.
“If you don’t straighten up I’m going to knock you into the middle of next week.”
4. My mother taught me about OSMOSIS.
“Shut your mouth and eat your supper.”
5. My mother taught me about the CIRCLE OF LIFE.
“I brought you into this world, I can take you out.”
6. My mother taught me about ENVY.
“There are millions of less fortunate children in the world who don’t have wonderful parents like you.”
7. My mother taught me about RECEIVING.
“You are going to get it when we get home.”
8. My mother taught me about GENEOLOGY.
“Shut that door… You think you were raised in a barn?”
9. My mother taught me about JUSTICE.
“One day you’ll have kids… I hope they turn out just like you!”
10. My mother taught me about LOGIC.
“Because I said so, That’s why.”
11. My mother taught me about STAMINA.
“You’ll sit there until your spinach is gone.”
12. My mother taught me about IRONY.
“Keep crying. I’ll give you something to cry about.”

 

Does anyone else use #4 and #12 on the daily like me?!

calvin_hobbes_shoveling

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